Possessions of the Habsburgs - Austria (XII-XX centuries)
In 1273, King Rudolph I became the first representative of the Habsburg clan who ascended to the Roman-German throne. It began the reign of the Habsburg dynasty, which lasted until…

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What is the cost of silver coins of Tsarist Russia
We can safely say that silver coins of tsarist Russia of 1700 - 1917, will definitely be able to delight everyone, even the most fastidious and demanding coin collector, otherwise…

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Coins and coin type of ancient Greece
The stamp imprint on the coins is the seal of the country or city that issued it. The drawings and inscriptions on the coins represent the most important concept of…

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Celtic Coins (III-I century BC)

The name “Celts” was first mentioned by the Greek historian Herodotus (Greek “keltoi” means “brave”). At one time, the Celts were scattered throughout Northern Europe, although it was never a question of any kind of Celtic public education, but at most temporary alliances of individual tribes to achieve certain goals.
From the 5th century to the 1st century BC Celtic art and culture dominated the territory between Turkey in the east and Ireland in the north-west. Since the Celts did not have their own written culture, almost all of our knowledge about them comes from the sources of their Greek and Roman opponents.
At the end of the third century, the Celts began issuing their own coins minted in Greek patterns. Most likely, the Celts were forced to take this step by the difficulties of barter with the Greek colonies expanding in the Mediterranean. Throughout its history, the Celts used gold, silver, potin (an alloy of copper and tin) and bronze to stamp their coins. The most famous Celtic gold coins are the so-called “rainbow bowls”, small Celtic plates in the form of plates, characterized by abstract symbolic patterns. According to popular belief, it was possible to distinguish a rainbow on Celtic coin images, as a result of which the coins got their name. By the stylistic differences of the coins, it is possible to determine on the territory of which settlements (Britain, Gaul or Spain) and by which tribes (Vindelis, Boi or Carnates) they were minted. The Celtic currency finally ended with the advent of the New Era, when almost all the regions previously inhabited by the Celts were conquered by the Romans.
Start collecting unique Celtic coins and immerse yourself in a world of images of one of the most ancient European cultures. Meet the rich symbols of the Celtic coins!

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